Skip to Main Content

Translational Life Science Technology (TLST)


 

Applied Biotechnology at UMBC

  • img03

    Introducing Dr. Wayman

  • img03

    Fee Waiver & Scholarship

  • img03

    Meet Dr. Annica Wayman, Program Director

  • Germantown Bioscience Education Center

    Classes located at MC Germantown Bioscience Education Center

UMBC’s Bachelor of Science in Translational Life Science Technology (TLST) is a unique degree designed for students who want to be competitive in the bioscience world of today and tomorrow. Students who complete this degree will have a comprehensive understanding of the following as they develop the diagnostic, therapeutic and vaccine answers to current and emerging health risks:

  • cell biology
  • biochemistry
  • lab instrumentation
  • statistics
  • epidemiology
  • biochemical engineering
In addition, students will master critical skills such as analytical thinking, data analysis, the ability to work in a team, and data evaluation. These skills, combined with the knowledge of science gained in the TLST program, will provide students with the tools necessary to succeed in the modern era of life sciences and go from “bench-to-bedside.”

Read about TLST in the news thanks to its important relationship to biotech companies in the area. Also learn how TLST is going to fill the gap in the biotech workforce! Get to know Dr. Annica Wayman, the new director of the program in UMBC Magazine.



Learn More About the Program

Suggested Transfer Pathways

The TLST Program is currently articulated with the following community college partners: Montgomery College

Other transfer pathways are under development. Please stay tuned.

Course Descriptions

Please view the Undergraduate Catalog for full course descriptions.

BTEC 300: Biotechnology Survey: Legal, Ethical, Regulatory & Biosafety Issues

This course will raise awareness on a range of non-technical topics that frame the field of translational medicine and the biotechnology industry. Weekly meetings will cover topics ranging from legal decisions that affect what products can be patented by the biotechnology industry, to regulatory trends in the US and abroad, to the ethics of genomic mining and manipulation, and synthetic life.

BTEC 303: Applied Cell Biology

This course will provide an overview of modern cell biology with emphasis on applications in cell-based therapeutics and commercial processes. The course will include a foundation in molecular aspects of cell biology including cell structure, organelle structure and function, protein trafficking, membrane dynamics, cell adhesion, signal transduction, cell cycle control, and cell death. These concepts will be presented in the context of current applications of cell biological approaches in clinical medicine and commercial production of biologicals. The course comprises a 1 CR laboratory component where students will learn hands-on techniques for cell culturing and imaging.

BTEC 310: Instrumentation & Methods for the Biotechnology Laboratory

Presented from the perspective of the biotechnology industry, this course will give a systematic, understandable, and practical introduction to basic biotechnology laboratory methods and the principles underlying the operation of common and sophisticated instrumentation. The course is intended for students who are interested in learning how to work in a biotechnology research & development laboratory.

BTEC 330: Software Applications in the Life Sciences

This course will provide an overview and basic practical skills in software tools that are used widely in biological research and development in the areas of general productivity, basic data analysis and databasing, statistical analysis and programming, analysis and comprehension of high-throughput genomic data, biological sequence analysis and bioinformatics, image analysis and morphometry.

BTEC 344: Epidemiology

This course will provide an intensive introduction to epidemiologic concepts and methods for students majoring in Translational Life Science Technology and for others intending to engage in, collaborate in, or interpret the results of epidemiologic research as a substantial component of their career.

BTEC 350: Statistics for Translational Life Science

This course will provide an effective introduction to statistical methods used commonly by researchers who engage in, collaborate in, or interpret results of Translational Life Science Technology.

BTEC 395: Translational Bioinformatics

This course introduces the emerging field of translational bioinformatics, which encompasses the development of algorithms for biological data analysis and their clinical and research applications. It covers four main topics: biological sequence analysis, biological databases and ontologies, whole- and meta-genome analysis and network biology. It includes a primer on evolutionary theory, high-throughput techniques, sequence statistics and other central concepts in bioinformatics, followed by an overview of the history, translational component and scientific impact of bioinformatics.

BTEC 430: Translational Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

This is an introductory level course focusing on essential concepts of biochemistry and molecular biology. Topics include the purification and analysis of macromolecules, the transmission of genetic information, and high throughput sequencing. This course also includes a six-week laboratory practicum on extraction, purification and analysis of DNA, RNA and proteins from cultured mammalian cells and E.coli.

BTEC 444: Translational Cancer Biotechnology

This course is designed to provide an in-depth overview of biotechnological aspects of the diagnosis, clinical management, and study of malignant disease. It is designed to provide Translational Biotechnology majors and others whose career path intersects with the course of neoplasia.

BTEC 453: Biochemical Engineering

An overview of biochemical and microbiological applications, commercial and engineering processes including: industrial fermentation, enzymology, ultrafiltration, chromatography, and food and pharmaceutical processing. Important principles include: enzyme kinetics, cell growth, energetics and mass transfer. Processes of interest include those that are involved in the formation of desirable compounds and products or in the transformation, or destruction of unwanted or toxic substances.

BTEC 462: Bioprocess Design and Control

This is a course in bioprocess control theory and applications. The first half of the course focuses on developing mathematical models for basic bioprocesses such as continuous reactor systems and heat transfer equipment. Students learn analytical techniques (MATLAB and Simulink) to find the time domain response of these systems to common types of forcing functions (step, pulse, and impulse functions). The second half of the course focuses on applying classical control theory to bioprocesses. Students construct block flow diagrams for the components of the control loop, and how to calculate the time domain closed loop response. Students also learn how to design feed-back control systems and various controller tuning techniques. The use of MATLAB, SIMULink, and instructor-written software allows students to observe process control behavior for a wide range of systems.

BTEC 470: Advanced Biomanufacturing

The course builds upon the foundation of bioprocess design principles and focuses on actual design projects, and includes components associated with financial analysis. Students taking this course are expected to demonstrate working knowledge of these principles in their design choices, reports and presentations.

BTEC 495: Professional Internship and Project-based Research Experience

This course will be offered in a two semester sequence, giving students an opportunity to acquire hands-on training in academic or industrial research labs that will be analogous to the undergraduate research experiences available on the UMBC campus.

Prerequisites

UMBC-Shady Grove provides upper-level coursework for transfer students who have completed or are near completion of lower-level course requirements. As such, only upper-level courses are offered at UMBC-Shady Grove specific to each of our undergraduate programs. Most students transferring into UMBC-Shady Grove have completed at least 45-50 credits prior to transferring and many students have earned their Associate Degree. The TLST Program requires you to complete the following courses prior to transfer:

  • Principles of Chemistry I & II and Introductory Chemistry Lab
  • Organic Chemistry I and Lab
  • Foundations of Biology: Cells, Energy & Organisms
  • Foundations of Biology: Ecology and Evolution
  • Microbiology
  • Introductory Physics
  • English Composition
  • Applied Calculus or Calculus I

In addition to the above courses, the following courses must be completed prior to graduation from UMBC. Ideally, a student will complete as many of the courses below as possible prior to transferring to UMBC-Shady Grove. Given that these requirements are typically met with lower-level courses, they must be taken at an institution other than UMBC-Shady Grove:

  • 3 Arts and Humanities courses (from at least two different disciplines)
  • 3 Social Science courses (from at least two different disciplines)
  • 1 Culture course
  • 2 Physical Education courses (consult advisor about exceptions)
  • World Language Intermediate-Level (consult advisor about exceptions)

Degree Requirements

Students pursuing a bachelor's degree must complete university requirements. Progress toward completion of university requirements is evaluated by means of the Transfer Credit Report (TCR) which is available online to students via myUMBC once admitted to the university. Progress toward major completion is evaluated in the academic departments. University requirements include:

General Requirements:

  • Minimum of 120 academic credits
  • Minimum of 2.0 grade point average
  • Two Physical Education courses
  • 45 Upper Level Credits

General Requirements are an important component of study at UMBC. Please refer to the following worksheets for guidance.

  • For students who entered higher education prior to Summer 2007: GFR Worksheet
  • For students entering higher education Summer 2007 or later: GEP Worksheet

Major Requirements:

Major Requirements Specific to TLST

Additional Advising Resources

Additional advising resources are available here. For more information on degree requirements, please contact the UMBC-Shady Grove Coordinator of Undergraduate Recruitment and Advising at 301-738-6281.

Faculty

Dr. Annica Wayman

Dr. Annica Wayman

Associate Dean
College of Natural and Mathematical Sciences
Phone: 301-738-6092
Email: awayman@umbc.edu
Office: Building III, Room 4131

Dr. Annica Wayman is the Associate Dean for Shady Grove Affairs in the College of Natural and Mathematical Sciences (CNMS) for UMBC. She is responsible for administering and directing the undergraduate Translational Life Sciences Technology (TLST) program and Master of Professional Studies in Biotechnology at the Universities at Shady Grove (USG). Dr. Wayman received her B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from UMBC and Ph.D. and M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her research focus at Georgia Tech was on selectin-mediated cell adhesion. Following Georgia Tech, Dr. Wayman worked at Becton, Dickinson & Co. (BD) where she served in various R&D engineering roles ranging from advanced technology development to new product development for their anesthesia platform. Immediately prior to her UMBC appointment as Associate Dean, she was Division Chief of the Research Partnerships for Development unit in the Global Development Lab at the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) where her team managed scientific research policies and programs for the agency and its more than 90 field offices worldwide and developed research partnerships with higher education institutions, federal science agencies, global development institutions, and private sector companies.


Dr. Mauricio Bustos

Associate Professor, Biological Sciences
Phone: 410-455-2769
Email: bustos@umbc.edu

Dr. Yvette Connell-Albert

Instructor
Email: ycalbert@umbc.edu

Yvette Connell-Albert received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Microbiology from the University of Maryland, College Park. She was employed as an Interdisciplinary Biologist/Microbiologist at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, while pursuing a Master of Science Degree in Biotechnology from the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. She was employed in a local biotechnology company before returning in 2004 to George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, to pursue a PhD degree in Functional Genomics. Most recently, she was in the Individual Graduate Partnership Program with George Mason University and the National Cancer Institute at Frederick, where she conducted her doctoral research studies in potential therapies against astrocytomas and glioblastomas. Her post-doctoral studies included a Master of Teaching and Leadership in Education Degree from Notre Dame Maryland University, Baltimore, Maryland. She is currently a Science Educator in the Washington Metro Area.

Dr. Dinesh Shukla

Instructor
Email: dinesh@umbc.edu

Dr. Shukla received his PhD in Bioengineering from the University of Illinois, Chicago with specific training and expertise in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Dr. Shukla’s research includes neurobiological changes associated with mental health. As a co-Investigator on NIH-funded grants, he has examined links between social cognitive deficits and underlying mechanisms in typically developing children and children with autism using MRI modalities with complementary strengths. Dr. Shukla was also involved on a project to develop advanced diffusion based MRI techniques and processing tool to study traumatic brain injury (TBI).

In addition, most recently Dr. Shukla has also been involved in genome wide association study (GWAS) and MR spectroscopy studies.

Career Opportunities

Maryland is home to over 33 labs and agencies and 300+ biotech companies, nearly 75% of those are in the Montgomery County region. The TLST program is designed to open many doors in the world of applied biotechnology, including the areas of

  • drug discovery
  • food and agriculture
  • environmental protection
  • forensics and security
  • manufacturing
Students graduating with this degree will have opportunities in research and development, manufacturing and services, quality and regulatory affairs, and management.

Learn more about Career Opportunities